Tag Archives: Washing Cloth Diapers

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When Your Wash Routine Has to Change

Once I get into a routine, habits are hard to break. For example, I usually eat the same thing for breakfast every day for a year or two at a time until I switch to something else, which I then eat every day for the next year or so. When we had my second son two years ago we decided to cloth diaper, and it was really easy for me to fall into a great wash/care routine. I did dirty diaper laundry every other day, and I usually used one of two great detergents that I love. I also use cloth wipes, and I would alternate between using plain water and a soap solution for my wipe water. I was happy, baby was happy, and all was well in cloth diaper land in the Gray household. Well, fast forward a year and a half and *poof* I don’t have an exclusively breastfed baby anymore, I have a toddler who eats an array of things, some of which he finds on the floor. With the almost constant change in my toddler, his increased activity rate, and his varying diet our cloth diaper care ceased to be as easy-breezy as it once was. My kiddo started getting yeast rashes that either took forever to clear up, or returned with annoying frequency. We dealt with yeast infections off and on for about six …

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Super-Pooper: One Mom’s Battle

Let’s talk about poop. More specifically, let’s talk about cleaning poopy diapers. If you’re pregnant or squeamish, stop reading and use the time to add to your wishlist on Kelly’s Closet. Okay, if you’re still reading then you, like me, have tried a million ways to deal with poopy diapers. I’m an expert on the practice since my adorable 2.5 year-old poops three times a day. Yes, you read that right –three poopy diapers a day. There may be a ploppable poop once a month. Yes, once a month. If the average child poops once a day, then that would be 1,000 poopy diapers for the last 33 months, give or take. I have had approximately 3,000 poopy diapers for this one child, give or take. (Sidenote: Please don’t worry about my son, he is ridiculously healthy and happy.) My son is efficient at processing his waste, which means that I have had to figure out how to process those dirty diapers. Let’s talk options. Diaper Sprayer: Some moms will tell you this is optional. For me there is no option. I have a bumGenius diaper sprayer and would have stopped cloth diapering without it. I am an expert on water pressure and gripping techniques. If I use flats or pockets, then the sprayer and I have no issues. The singular surface is a cinch to spray with no real …

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Learning How to Wash Your Diapers

One of the biggest problems that cloth diaper users face is simply getting them clean. There are so many factors that go into washing diapers: He or traditional washing machine; front or top load machine; hard, soft or average water; synthetic or natural fibers. Then of course there’s one of the biggest factors—your detergent. All of these factors can easily scare off a person from trying cloth diapers, but after you establish a good (aka working) wash routine (and it really isn’t as hard and scary as is sounds), washing your diapers is no big deal. The first thing you need to figure out is what type of water you have. Kelly’s Closet sells a water test strip for under a dollar, and you can find kits at any home improvement store. You simply run the strip under your water for a few seconds and compare the color to the enclosed chart. Knowing what type of water you have aids you in determining how much detergent you will need and if you will need any additives to soften your water. If you water is hard, you most likely will want to add Calgon (a water softener available in the laundry aisle) and use slightly more detergent than directed. If it is soft, you will want to use slightly less detergent. The next step in calculating your perfect wash routine is …

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Conquering the Beast

Let’s talk poop. It’s a beast but everyone does it, including babies. Since we’ve started to cloth diaper on an island in the Caribbean things have gotten trickier than in the states. There has to be a way to do it and I am determined to find out how. Captains log Day One: The island received me with open arms, but I didn’t tell her we were going to cloth diaper. So far we are still on good terms. We’re easing our way into things. The island universe hasn’t caught on yet that we’re transitioning from disposables to cloth, so no known horrific incidents occurred. We’ll hope this continues. Day Two: My diaper sprayer doesn’t attach to our British toilets. $50.00 just went down the drain (pun intended). It wouldn’t be such a big deal, but I thought we were safe and forgot to put liners in the diapers… twice. Poop everywhere. Oh the horror! The carnage! Poop water was everywhere! I had a ten month old clinging to my leg as I struggled to swish and shake that nuisance out of my gorgeous Bumgenius 4.0 in Mirror. Something so beautiful should never have to go through something like that. I then watched in horror with my hands soiled in the miscreants morning load as that said miscreant reached for the toilet. It was all in slow motion but I …

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Washing a Reduced Load of Cloth Diapers During Potty Training

For a lot of moms that have gotten used to cloth diapering for two (or more) years, potty training can be a funny kind of mourning. Many silently cry a tear or two when packing away each size of diaper, wondering if they will be used again, or if their diapering days are over. Some even go on mini denial induced spending sprees of newborn fluff for new babies they aren’t even expecting yet, just to get that fluffy high! Still others rejoice in the lack of laundry and don’t miss their child’s cloth diapers one bit. They are ready to move on to the next stage. Whatever category you fall under, one day soon, your kids will enter the potty training stages. Slowly you can put your diapers away with less frequency until, well, it doesn’t matter if they’re organized or not… oops! Whether you use funky colored and printed cloth trainers or plain old underwear, it’s likely you’ll still use cloth diapers at first for travel, naps, and night time, before trimming down to just night time. You might have a day with no wet diapers at all, or just a few accidental drops. In any case, you’ll have very few lonely diapers to launder. So what to do with these itty bitty loads? There are roughly 3 camps: 1. Some moms wash in the sink by hand …

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