Tag Archives: Rash Care

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What’s with the Rash?

There are a lot of cloth diapering moms that get really, really lucky. As long as their babies are cloth diapered, they almost never have to deal with a serious rash. Whether it’s the lack of chemicals or simply the stay-dry fabric, their tiny bundle’s bum remains entirely rash-free throughout all of their cloth diapering career. “Why,” they brag openly, “the most I ever had to deal with was a little bit of redness!” That’s great for those moms (and their babies), but others just aren’t that lucky. So what do you do when your baby gets a rash while they’re in cloth? Consult your doctor, not the internet. If you Google, the results will terrify you (because of course, the first result is never “this is a perfectly common rash that will clear up on its own”). If you go to a Facebook board, the answers will range far and wide, with every mom swearing by a completely different remedy. If your baby has a challenging rash that just won’t go away, or a particularly bad rash, or even just a rash that causes you to worry, then talk to your pediatrician! They’ve seen it all before and will have a better idea of how to treat it. That’s not to say that your mommy friends won’t have some great natural remedies for minor diaper rash; it’s just to …

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Adventures in Booty Rash

When Little B developed an infected ingrown toenail at just 2 months old, I thought that the antibiotics that the doctor prescribed to treat it would be the end of my worries. Little did I know that our adventure was just beginning! About a week into the 2-week course of antibiotics, he started developing a diaper rash. Back to the nurse’s hotline I went! Having described the little red bumps and redness in the creases of his legs and that if I only put rash cream on the red part, other areas just broke out, the nurse and I were able to determine that Little B had likely developed a yeast rash. Since I caught it at the very beginning, she suggested that instead of prescription medicine, we should try some home remedies first. So we gave him baths 3 times a day in warm water and baking soda followed by lots of diaper-free time, and continuing with traditional (petroleum-based) cream mixed with over-the-counter miconazole (yeast infection cream) at every diaper change. This necessitated the use of a flushable liner. We liked the Bummis brand because their generous size kept our diapers protected even when they inevitably shifted, however we did find that we had to throw them out rather than flush because our old plumbing could not handle them. After two weeks on this regimen, we were all getting …

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StreptoWHAT?

It began as a simple rash. We’d dealt with these before. I was a pro. I have extremely sensitive skin and I often get rashes when the weather is changing, when I try a new product or, basically, whenever I breathe. The rash on my 2 and a half year old son’s bottom looked just like the kind of rash I get on my legs where my pants rub and I just assumed his skin was suffering from the dry Colorado weather like mine does every.single.year. I slathered the rash with all kinds of creams from calendula, GroVia Magic Stick to CJ’s BUTTer. We tried air time, changing to pull-ups at night instead of cloth diapers. We even tried coconut oil. But the rash got worse. The spots started to bleed. I just assumed that was because he just wouldn’t stop itching. We couldn’t kick it. And then my daughter got a weird sore on her neck. Little pimple like sores started popping up on her legs and face and then finally on her diaper area. In a matter of mere hours, the rash went from something that looked simple and manageable to a site that truly scared me. I decided it was time to go see the pediatrician. The answer, “Streptococcal.” StreptoWHAT?! I’d never heard of it but I knew I was David and this rash was Goliath. She …

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Not all Sensitivities are Created Equal

We started cloth diapering our older boy when he was two-and-a-half. I thought I had everything figured out by the time we had our second child, but baby number two has proven to be difficult. As much as we loved our pocket diapers with our first child, our second has sensitive skin, and almost all man-made fibers give him diaper rash, especially polyester. For those who don’t know, microfiber and fleece both are made from polyester- that’s a lot of diaper material! At first, I freaked out, wondering if we were going to be able to cloth diaper him at all. Then I realized that disposable diapers would only made the problem worse, and I bucked up and started trying things. We have destashed and restashed three (yes, three!) times in the past four months, and here’s what I’ve learned: Not all sensitivities are created equal. Technically, our son does not have any allergies to diaper material. Some kids do have allergies to certain materials, and those allergies will result in a rash that looks like hives. Sensitivities, however, are much harder to figure out. Generally, kids with sensitive skin will get diaper rash when they wear an incompatible diaper, and this rash may be difficult to get rid of. The resulting rash will usually be at its worst in the morning, after baby has had the diaper on the …

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Cloth Diapering a Sensitive Bottom

We’ve all heard cloth is good for baby’s skin as compared to the plastics and chemicals commonly found in disposables, but what if your cloth diapered baby breaks out into a rash that clears up when you switch back to throw-aways? This happens more often than you might think, but there are lots of things you can try before giving up on cloth. First of all, tackle the rash while you search for the cause. For a generic rash, any cloth diaper safe cream will do, but if you need something stronger or have to get a prescription and the ingredients aren’t cloth friendly, invest in a roll of flushable liners to use in your diapers while medicating your little one’s bum. They are very economical; the 100-count Bummis roll is just $8.00. And before assuming cloth is the problem, rule out medical or biological causes like yeast, food allergies, teething, colds and flu, all which can spark a rash on your baby’s bottom. Ok, so if baby is not sick or teething and doesn’t have any food allergies, then why the rash? Is your baby wearing primarily pockets? If so, then the answer is most likely that he or she is sensitive to microfleece, suedecloth or velour, all of which are commonly used to line the inside of diapers. Although these are marketed as “stay dry” fabrics and work …

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